When you are tired of the endless race of life, nature could be our best peace-maker. The wonderful creations of nature can be a feast for the eyes and undemanding. The black sand beach of Iceland or Reynisfjara is such a beautiful gift from mother nature. This place is a definition to the famous quote by Leigh Hunt,

“Colours are the smiles of nature.”

The black sand beach of Iceland or Reynisfjara is known to be the world’s most beautiful and famous black sand beach. The mysterious yet dangerous beauty unveiling from the rich black sands of beaches could create a paradise in front of your eyes.

What do you have to know about the black sand beach or Reynisfjara of Iceland? Keep reading this article, and we hope to unfold some important facts you long to learn.

Location

The black sand beach or Reynisfjara of Iceland is situated around 180 kilometers or 112 miles from the capital city of Iceland, Reykjavik. This is also known to be one of the famous sojourns for the ones who are sightseeing along the popular South Coast. Generally, it takes a whole day to visit this place and return to the capital city, Reykjavik. However, there are a lot more fascinating sites to stay in that area too.

Why Is It Called the Black Sand Beach?

Have you ever wondered why the black sand beach got its name? There is a geological reason for these beaches to have a rich jet-black color in their sands. Iceland is famously known to be the Land of Fire as it is home to around 130 volcanoes and glaciers. Many out of those volcanoes are active today, and the black sand beach rises from volcanic ashes. When molten lava enters the water, an intense interaction takes place between the hot lava and seawater.

The lava cools so quickly that it breaks into debris and sand instantaneously. A massive lava flow to freezing seawater produces enough fragments to create a new black sand beach in a few hours. However, the black beach sand of Reynisfjara has been formed during a major eruption of the Katla Volcano. Katla is one of the well-known volcanoes situated nearest to Reynisfjara, due to erupt at any time of the year.

The Significance of the Black Sand Beach of Iceland

The black sand beach or, Reynisfjara is one of the world’s most extraordinary places in the total sense of the words. And also a popular tourist destination. It is a place where beauty and danger combine together. World-famous magazines such as Conde Nast Traveller and National Geographic have top-listed the black sand beach of Iceland as one of the most beautiful beaches on the planet.

This beach is obviously not recommended as a good place for sunbathing, especially during summer. But it is indeed an aesthetical sensation of nature ranked for its beautiful black sand. Reynisfjara is an Ecstacy of jet black sand with smooth pebbles, basalt stacks, and hexagonal-shaped basalt columns. Incredible lava formations, towering cliffs, basalt caves, and breathtaking stone arches enhance the beauty of the beach.

The sands of Reynisfjara are known to be pitch black and wet compared to the black sand beaches in the world. This is because the black sand beach of Iceland is in the rainiest part of the country. Therefore the sand never gets dry and gray. The columnar joints of Reynisfjara are undeniably one of the most photographed places in Iceland. Moreover, they are considered to be one of the most dazzling places in the world. Formed by volcanic forces, these closely spaced fractures occur only in volcanic rocks, in basalt mostly. Thanks to the sudden cooling of lava, they are created and takes the shapes of symmetric or geometric edges.

The Dark Side of Reynisfjara

On the other hand, the black sand beach is popular to be dangerous despite the beauty it has. Unfortunately, it is actually one of the most dangerous places in Iceland. Famous for its high and hazardous tides, the visitors SHOULD stay away from the water and restrain from climbing the basalt cliffs. The rigorous and high tides have already taken a few lives, so it is crucial to be careful if you hope to visit the black sand beach of Iceland.